Upland Review

I developed a magazine with the idea of showcasing the annual activities and accomplishments of Blue Mountains Pheasants Forever, Chapter 258, through photo essay. I also included a couple additional hunting articles.

I retain the magazine as a separate publication from the Chapter with a plan of developing it into a free online magazine to showcase fledgling outdoor writers and the beauty of upland bird hunting.

Give it a read at Upland Review.

BMPF Sets Youth Circuit

Published 24 May 2018 in the Walla Walla Union Bulletin.

“Pull…” a shooter calls out, followed by a white clay launching from the trap, sailing to the left; a random, unexpected direction. The sleek over/under shotgun tracks smoothly until the bead connects, and upon recoil, dissolves the clay into a fine dust.

In support of the national Pheasants Forever No Child Left Indoors initiative, the local Blue Mountain Pheasants Forever (BMPF) chapter sponsors a youth shooting circuit each year beginning in June. The circuit consists of four monthly scheduled trap shoots introducing youth to wing shooting and firearms safety. Each trap shoot consists of five stations where the shooter is presented with five clay targets, thrown in random directions from a front and center automatic launcher. Youth are afforded the opportunity to learn proper stance and shooting technique, as well as how to lead a flying target.

The Family Challenge Trap Shoot rounds out the trap events and puts the skills learned in prior months to the test. Parent-child teams shoot together in a friendly competition among participating families. Small prizes, sweetened by modest bragging rights, are afforded the teams who bust the most clays.

Following the trap circuit, BMPF also sponsors two fall pheasant hunts that again test the skills learned from shooting trap. The BMPF supplies pheasants and designated venues for the youth hunting weekend in September, and again in November for a special family hunt. For the September youth hunt, participants are split into groups based on their experience levels, and everyone is afforded an opportunity at a rooster. For some participants, this event is their first hunting experience. It exposes children to the art of upland bird hunting with a well-trained pointing dog (courtesy of chapter members), and the irreplaceable adrenaline rush from the king of upland birds erupting under foot.

The Family Hunt is held the Saturday after Thanksgiving as a token of appreciation for the BMPF membership’s support of the chapter and youth program. This event serves as the culmination of the annual shooting events. Held at the Clyde Shooting Preserve, the Family Hunt provides youth and family members the opportunity to experience a unique, quality pheasant hunt provided at a professional establishment.

On a typical hunt, pheasant are planted, followed shortly by the release of the hunting dogs. Participants hunt their way through the designated fields, following up on the elegant and stylish canines on point. The most memorable moments of the hunt are made of a pointing dog at work, and the explosive flush of a dazzling rooster. Participating family members of all ages enjoy what some would call an epic morning afield.

All BMPF-sponsored youth events are open to anyone age eighteen and under, with the exception of the youth hunting weekend in September. The youth hunting weekend is designated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and requires hunters to be under the age of sixteen. Parents or adult mentors are asked to participate in events with their children. All events are free to participants, and all new youth participants are registered as BMPF members, courtesy of the chapter.

Youth event details are announced in advance through local events calendars, as well as at the BMPF website www.bmpf258.com. General chapter information is also available online, and the chapter may be contacted via email at bmpf@bmpf258.com.

 

Propagating an Outdoor Heritage

Published July 26th, 2019 in the Milton-Freewater Valley Herald

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What do native habitat restoration, clay targets and the youth of our local communities have in common? Pheasants Forever. And the future of native habitat conservation and outdoor recreation at the hands of our future leaders advocating for all of these.

Habitat enhancement and youth involvement in the outdoors are the two primary focuses and programs for Walla Walla’s Pheasants Forever chapter, Blue Mountain Pheasants Forever (Chapter). The Chapter continues to maintain their staple projects to include an 88-acre grassland restoration site near Touchet, WA, and a shrub-steppe restoration site just north of Walla Walla on Highway 125, where native shrubs and wildlife watering stations referred to as “guzzlers” were installed.

Over the years, the Chapter has planted hundreds of acres in native grass and shrubs to the benefit of the wildlife and communities within and surrounding Walla Walla. Looking ahead, the Chapter continually seeks new habitat enhancement opportunities to include the Milton-Freewater area.

Presently, with the future of our hunting heritage and wildlife habitat riding largely on the shoulders of a demographic no younger than age 40, youth involvement in the outdoors has never been more critical. Therefore, Pheasants Forever’s No Child Left Indoors initiative was established to address the dwindling youth interest in and introduction to the outdoors.

Serving the No Child Left Indoors initiative, investing in and encouraging youth to embrace outdoor recreation and kindle a passion for our nation’s public lands, outdoor opportunities and habitat conservation is integral to the Chapter’s Youth Committee.

 The Chapter’s annual youth program consists of sponsoring four trap-shooting events, a youth pheasant hunt in September, and a family hunt in November after Thanksgiving. Chapter sponsorship includes a Pheasants Forever youth membership (for new members), hearing protection, firearms safety and handling guidance, clay targets, shotgun shells and coaching (if desired), all free of charge for youth participants, age 18 and under.

July is in the thick of the Chapter’s youth trap circuit, and East End Rod and Gun Club in Milton-Freewater hosted the second shoot of the season on Saturday, July 20th. Youth attendance was sparse this particular morning, but eleven-year-old Sarah Shutters of Dayton, WA, a first-time trap shooter, stepped up to the stand wielding a beautiful 20-gauge Winchester 1400 autoloader that her dad, Marvin, customized to fit.

A dark ponytail poked through the back of a black Remington cap as Sarah stood confident behind the clay launcher. Peering up through dark aviator sunglasses, she accepted rapid-fire coaching from Chapter member, Dean Wass.

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“Keep your head down. Keep the butt tight against your shoulder. Keep your face tight to the stock and sight straight down the barrel. Track the clay with the bead and squeeze the trigger.”

The Winchester reported while an unbroken clay sailed off into the field, busting as it touched down in the dry summer soil.

“Okay, you shot a little high. Again, keep your face tight against the stock. Lean into the gun. Shift your weight to your left [front] leg. Don’t shoot so fast. You have time. Your shot pattern is only about a foot wide where that clay was at the time you shot.”

Sarah nodded affirmative, shouldered her Winchester and called for her clay. “PULL!”

Seated behind her, I watched as Sarah mastered the challenge. The launcher clanked, sending the clay into motion, and with perfect posture, she quickly acquired the target. The Winchester barrel smoothly tracked the flight path. I could almost smell the clay dust before Sarah touched trigger. And to no surprise, the recoil of the gun resulted in full contact with a clay that burst like fireworks on Independence Day. Celebratory grunts erupted from the peanut gallery.

Sarah adjusted her sunglasses and reloaded. No sweat. Business as usual. Meanwhile, Marvin observed with pride as Sarah repeated the performance, busting more clays than her ol’ man on her pioneer attempt.

The Chapter is proud to welcome returning and new youth participants like Sarah, and is committed to providing positive experiences with shooting sports and conservation. No prior experience or opportunity required.

As outdoors enthusiasts and conservationists, it’s our responsibility to share our passions and recruit the next generation to carry the torch. Navigating environmental and political hurdles to perpetuate the integrity of our nation’s natural resources and rich outdoor heritage requires the kind of commitment that only passion can fuel, and getting youth outdoors is where it all begins.